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-   -   ‘Make dancehall music great again’ (http://www.reggaeboyzsc.com/forum1/showthread.php?t=80343)

Jangle August 11th, 2019 08:53 AM

‘Make dancehall music great again’
 
Browne - Foreigners top charts with dancehall while locals using knock-off hip hop beats

In a blistering message on social media last week, dancehall producer-turned-Christian, Danny Browne, threw out a challenge to ‘make dancehall great again’. Browne chastised the proponents of the genre for using knock-off hip hop beats and plastering over it a dancehall label.

“Taking a hip hop beat and calling it dancehall does not make it dancehall,” he stated in his Instagram post.

“Listen to these beats, listen to the music. If you should remove the vocals, there would be nothing left to identify this as Jamaican. Whereas, if you go back as late as 2005, all the way back to the ‘80s, there are so many riddims, and without any vocals at all, it is still undoubtedly Jamaican.” He continued with some examples: “Bam Bam Riddim, Pepperseed Riddim, Mad Dawg Riddim, Liquid Riddim ... But pick a song now, for example, Tuff by Rygin King. Remove the vocals from that, there is nothing to identify that music as Jamaican.”

http://jamaica-gleaner.com/article/e...ers-top-charts

Reggaedoc August 11th, 2019 02:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jangle (Post 600886)
Browne - Foreigners top charts with dancehall while locals using knock-off hip hop beats

In a blistering message on social media last week, dancehall producer-turned-Christian, Danny Browne, threw out a challenge to ‘make dancehall great again’. Browne chastised the proponents of the genre for using knock-off hip hop beats and plastering over it a dancehall label.

“Taking a hip hop beat and calling it dancehall does not make it dancehall,” he stated in his Instagram post.

“Listen to these beats, listen to the music. If you should remove the vocals, there would be nothing left to identify this as Jamaican. Whereas, if you go back as late as 2005, all the way back to the ‘80s, there are so many riddims, and without any vocals at all, it is still undoubtedly Jamaican.” He continued with some examples: “Bam Bam Riddim, Pepperseed Riddim, Mad Dawg Riddim, Liquid Riddim ... But pick a song now, for example, Tuff by Rygin King. Remove the vocals from that, there is nothing to identify that music as Jamaican.”

http://jamaica-gleaner.com/article/e...ers-top-charts

So true. I cant tell the difference. The same goes for soca. Disgraceful!!!

Sir X August 11th, 2019 05:27 PM

Agreed.

Jangle September 16th, 2019 09:47 AM

Trap Dancehall Isn’t Going Anywhere, Say Genre’s Producers


Simply put, Jamaica’s musical influences have always been borderless. The island’s première genre, mento, was rooted in elements of African and European music. Its transitional genre, Jamaica rhythm and blues, saw early Jamaican artistes adopting American rhythm and blues in the late 1950s, bearing songs like Oh Carolina by Count Ossie and the Mystic Revelation of Rastafari and Muriel by Alton and Eddy. The relatively new trap dancehall phenomenon is the perfect example of this musical crystallisation, and whereas the era of Jamaican rhythm and blues did not last a decade, the lead producers of trap dancehall believe that the genre is here to stay.

“That ain’t going nowhere. Everybody is gravitating to it, and the young people nuh really want straight dancehall, dem waan dah trap dancehall, bouncy something deh,” Fabian ‘Wizzy’ Hilton from Hemton Music told The Gleaner.

“I think dem like the freshness of it. The young people like the style and uniqueness, so a lot of people work with it more than the original dancehall,” Mario ‘Din Din’ Hemmings, the other half of Hemton’s production duo, said.

http://jamaica-gleaner.com/article/e...nres-producers

Assasin September 16th, 2019 01:15 PM

Long time I spoke about it. Meanwhile Koffee a mash up the world.

Jangle September 22nd, 2019 08:39 AM

Strike the Balance! - Ky-Mani Marley advises artistes to find middle ground

Internationally renowned reggae artiste Ky-Mani Marley has years of musical experience under his belt. As son of reggae legend Bob Marley, the Grammy-nominated artiste knows exactly what it takes to make music timeless music, songs that will transcend geographical boundaries and positively impact society. It is with that expertise that he is urging today’s generation of artistes to try and find balance when creating new content.

“My family has always been about building, creating, innovating, and that’s why we have been able to stay on the front line of the charts. We do not follow trends. What I think we (as an industry) lacking is our originality. I feel like nuff a di man dem in the genre come do a song and it hit, and a next man come do a song inna da same vein deh without creating his own,” he said.


http://jamaica-gleaner.com/article/e...-middle-ground

Jangle September 22nd, 2019 08:43 AM

Ghanaian artiste defends patois

Ghanaian reggae and dancehall artiste Stonebowy has defended his practice of performing a lot of his music using the Jamaican patois.

The artiste was forced to defend himself after being accused of selling his native Ghanian culture short by performing using the Jamaican popular language.

In an interview with the Jamaica Observer in Miami a year ago Stonebwoy, whose given name is Livingstone Etse Satekla, said his attraction to Jamaican music came through his travels and being exposed to a wide range of musical genres.
“One ting me know is that this whole movement is not new; it has always been heard of, but I am a proper representation of its existence. Jamaican people know about Afro beats and the other type a song dem. Jamaican people know seh dem roots is in Africa and all the music that come from the continent. I born a Ghana, grow up in Ghana, but I travel around a lot, so the influence of my music is not only Afro beats but Afro beats that has the dancehall and reggae elements in there. History shows me where all these music come from, so I am a physical representation of that movement. We are one people; it's just because of the slave trade and what that did, so now di culture is diverse. In these times music is a universal language and now it's gonna get broader than just reggae music or just dancehall. right now it is the combination of all these musical forms that goes into creating my sound.”

http://www.jamaicaobserver.com/enter...=MobileArticle


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